Book Review (+Tips): On Writing by Stephen King

Read from July 6th, 2018 to July 30th, 2018.
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Wow, Stephen King is so enjoyable to read, even in his nonfiction, how-to book, On Writing: A Memoir Of The Craft. This is a great read for any upcoming writer. He has advice for the beginners and the veterans, but mainly for people just starting out. I would say I’m somewhere in the middle, and I felt confident to agree or disagree with some things that King said regarding topics.
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It was just a lots of fun facts about him in the memoir portion and cool ways to look at writing. I’m giving Stephen King’s On Writing: A Memoir Of The Craft a 5/5. My rating system is at the bottom of this post.
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I also wanted to share some brief tips with you from On Writing that I personally believe and recommend. Here are those writing tips:
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  1. When you’re getting started, write for yourself. You’re telling yourself a story, not anyone else. A second draft is the edited version of the first. At that point, you’re writing for everyone else and therefore taking out things that don’t have anything to do with the story/plot. Those little subtle details that have nothing to do with the story but you love so much? Throw them out.
  2. Find people who get it. You want to have at least one person by your side who believes in what you’re doing. They are half your confidence from here on out.
  3. Use the first words that come to your head. “Why use an alternative word whose only cousin is the word you really meant?” It’s okay if you’re vocabulary is sparse, you don’t have to spruce your words to get the story going.
  4. You can be as vulgar as you need to, as long as you’re characters and narrator are being honest. “Language doesn’t always wear a tie and lace-up shoes.”
  5. You have to feel the beat of your words and paragraphs and chapters. When you feel like it’s time to end a paragraph, then it’s time. Sentences don’t have to be grammatically correct. A thought.
  6. “It’s not just a question of how-to [practice writing], it’s also a question of how much to. Reading will help you answer how much, and only reams of writing will help you with the how.” Read and write every day. This shouldn’t feel like work at all.
  7. This kind of goes with number 1. The first draft, you’re getting out the story. The second draft, you’re doing a lot of things, like looking to see if you can find theme throughout the book. If you don’t, that’s fine. But if you do, don’t miss the opportunity to expand on that idea.
Hope you guys found something useful! There’s a lot more tips in the book. I imagine that your favorites will be different from mine, so go read it!
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  • My rating system stands: 5/5 is a knock out of the park; this book deserves to be read by everyone. 4/5 is, “I really liked it,” but it did have a couple of kinks. 3/5 is, “I believe there are a lot of people who would enjoy this book, but for one reason or another, it didn’t sit well with me.” 2/5 is, “I really didn’t enjoy it and I’m not going to recommend it.” 1/5 is, “no one read this – throw it in a lake.”

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

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Inspirational Writing Story

When I had finally hit rock bottom was when I realized I wanted to be a writer. Many people start writing, and the reasons they start are very different, I think. For me, I had decided to pick up writing one early morning, and by early I mean middle-of-the-night early, before I clicked the next episode on Netflix. I was sitting in the dark in my childhood bedroom, alone, a college dropout, living with my parents, jobless, and even though I was only nineteen, it felt like I had wasted away a perfectly good life.

I needed help. Right then and there, I decided to write a long essay summarizing the previous years that led up to that morning. But after I was done, I felt something that I hadn’t in a long time: hunger.

You see, I had written one chapter after another, unaware that night had given away to morning, and that morning had given away to afternoon. I was unaware of how tired I should’ve been, but I didn’t feel tired at all. I was starving, literally and metaphorically.

I broke away from my computer twenty document pages later, realizing I’d been starving myself of something for some time now. What was this feeling? I had not felt anything since the day I graduated high school. On graduation day, I drew with chalk a wild cat on the sidewalk leading into the school building. I’ll miss you, NU! I captioned it. That day, I coined the phrase ‘to make a difference, you have to be a little different’ as my Words of Wisdom. I’d worked so hard leading up to that day, to keep my grades up and graduate in the top percentile. But until this early morning, I had not logged one memorable accomplishment in the past long year.

I never came close to writing this much in one sitting before, however. This was an internal discovery.

At first, I didn’t think I was a writer. I was simply writing a stress-relieving prose to myself. It wasn’t good at all. I didn’t know what proper grammar was. My spelling was atrocious. I’d gotten through every language arts class by using of Sparknotes. And in the back of my mind, I was sure that none of the twenty pages I had conjured were coherent enough to follow, unless I was the one reading it. But at least this had given me an idea – a task – to finish the story. To edit the thing if only to improve it so someone else could read it and understand what I was going through.

The lingering hunger was real, though. I typed “how to write a book” in YouTube’s search engine and found lots of resources. Scrolling through grammar videos, I stumbled across publishing sites and critique circles. I kept my involvement on my first critique circle low-key, only leaving feedback on partial manuscripts and never submitting chapters of my own. Eventually, after learning what good and bad writing was and many revisions of my work later, I posted my essay to these same websites and got lots of criticism, occasionally feeling dumb for spelling something horrifically incorrect.

I was enthralled. Any feedback, good or bad, made me so much hungrier. I resubmitted works after works until, finally, I felt like I could do something with my twenty-page thing. Twenty pages turned into fifty. Fifty turned into a hundred.

A few months later, on 2014’s New Year’s Eve, I made a decision to start documenting my writing progress on YouTube, like so many before me had done. In my first vlog (video blog), I publicly announced that I was going to publish a book within the next year. On top of that, I was going to read more. I thought reading books would help me know what was worth publishing. I was going to start a written blog, too. I was even going to attempt something called NaNoWriMo. During National Novel Writing Month, I would have to write 50,000 words, 1,666 words each day for a month. I was going to wait until November, the normal time to do it, but that was almost a year away and so I jumped the gun, finishing a total of two or three seasons before May.

Somehow, I felt like I’d joined a bigger conversation that had been going on since the beginning of time. With these new skills, I connected with some amazing people, gained more than a thousand subscribers, guest-spoke on NaNoWriMo’s YouTube channel, was featured on a podcast, annually read roughly twelve books, and most importantly I published my first of hopefully many books. Since that lonely morning three years ago, I can say that I’ve grown so much as an artist and as an individual. It never occurred to me that I’d one day be humbled by reading or writing.

And now with my full and purposeful life, I’m constantly craving for more, and I hope that hunger is never filled.

Thanks for reading,

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

Pretending to Be A Writer Makes You A Better Writer


You can tell what good writing is. I can tell what good writing is. We get drawn into good writing, which is how we know. But how does the writer know it’s good writing?

So a while back, I was writing a story. It had a decent outline and a reasonably cliché plot behind it. I thought I could put some of my own twists on this plot so that it’s unique. I figured the way I told the story would be different from how anyone else could tell the story.

When I started writing this story, there were parts that my heart beat escalated and my words moved across the page in rapid motions. Then there were other times I was simply writing to fill the gaps. These fillers I thought long and hard about, but the only thing I could come up with were basic ideas I’ve seen a million times in other stories like this one. I figured it wouldn’t matter if this one scene was similar since a lot of the book was unique. I wasn’t able to judge the work. I heard so many people say “just write the story, don’t care was others think.” So I didn’t. But after reading a few other books, I had an epiphany.

Those moments I kept it basic were my book’s weakest points. After reading a story that at some moments I was like, “wow, this is a really good writer. They really know how to write a ____ and ____,” and others I was like, “wait, are they good? This seems too cliché,” I realized that the cliché parts were fillers, like what I did when I was writing. It wasn’t that the parts I liked weren’t reused ideas – in fact, they kind of were, but the parts were told passionately and with the author’s own flare. The parts I didn’t like were cliché, rushed, not passionate, simple connect-the-dots parts.

My advice would be to always feel passionate about what you’re writing. If you do this from start to finish, you will tell a unique story, using interesting chapters, words, and sentence structures.

Another tip would be to pretend to be a writer, always. Even if you write, you might not be the ideal “writer.” How does a horror writer talk and act while explaining their story to the press? How do they write their stories? What is the voice that resonates with the readers in the genre you’re writing? I always copycat a writer in my genre, thinking hard about how they would write a sentence in my book. It’s one of my greatest inspirations!

I hope that helped spark some writing in all of you!

Thanks for reading,

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

Pen Names: What Are They and How To Use Them


This blog was written by me, but inspired by my fans’ comments on my YouTube video, NaNoWriMo Publishing Edition: Day 24.

So what is a pen name? If you’re curious what a pen name is, or sometimes referred to as a pseudonym, they’re names on works that hide identities, organize works into groups, used as a marketing strategy – they’re used for all sorts of things!

Maybe your genre doesn’t match with what name you’re writing under. Rainbow Rowell wouldn’t be found on a horror novel. Maybe R. Rowell would be preferred. This is a marketing strategy. The author still wants to put their books under the same name, but they switch around how they spell out or initial their name on the cover to better fit the genre.

Some people want privacy. Maybe Rainbow Rowell isn’t her name at all. Maybe she’s writing horrors and romances under this fake name so her family doesn’t know her secret fascination with fictional characters. This is still a nice strategy, even when matching names with genres – because you can still change from using initials to full names. It’s just not your real name.

There’s something about being unable to sign your real name on the book cover that is so heartbreaking for some. But deciding on your name is something I would consider at the beginning of your career, before you release anything. Once you start on a path, like using your real name, it’s hard to use anything else. You can, but it’s like starting over, because you’re basically being labeled as a new author.

One of my published fans told me he wrote in pen names. He used totally different names for different genres and got less revenue from that because fans didn’t know the books were written by the same person, so there was a marketing rift.

One fan said she could never use her real name, afraid her family might find out. But from what I can gather, she is still publishing under that name and has made a decent amount of success from it. She was consistent in using the same name, even if it wasn’t her real one.

A few other reasons you might want to use a pen name is because your name is too long, or your name is hard to pronounce, or it reads wrong in translation. I met a waiter once who called himself Erin, because people couldn’t pronounce his real name, Eran with a squiggle over the “a.”

So consider your situation, what you’re writing, and what you’re comfortable with. You never have to use your real name. You don’t have to use your real name or always use your fake name. But you can if that is what you’d rather do. You can use abbreviations or initials.

What I can gather from the comments is that “your name is your brand,” and to build your brand, you should try to keep your name(s) as consistent as possible. The route I’m going to take with my books is to use my real name and mess around with initials when I write a completely different genre. Mainly, I’m going to look at the cover and ask, “Will they take my book seriously with that name on there?” If I think it’s fine, I’ll leave it. It all comes down to the cover for me.

Thanks for reading guys!

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

How To Plot Out A Thriller/Mystery

A year ago, I plotted out my own little mystery thriller and hope to make it into a book one day. I enjoyed the scheming and implanting surprises. So here’s how I did it.

I knew I could complete a story in as many chapters as I needed. However, I didn’t have a story yet. So I thought I’d see what I could come up with in 27 chapters (3x3x3). I didn’t end up using all of them, but it did get the ball rolling

I came up with my ending first. What did I want to accomplish? What emotional state was each character going to be in?

I worked backward. I felt like my beginning should be the exact opposite. I wanted a story where my characters were heroic and loving at the end and lame and hateful at the beginning. I wanted there to be two main characters who grow closer throughout the book.

I had a beginning, a middle, and an end: boring and strangers, action and comrades, heroes and friends.

Then I decided what kind of action: do I want it to be a crime? A jungle adventure? A spy undercover operation? The list goes on. I thought a crime would be interesting. Multiple crimes, in fact.

So, I split my beginning into three parts, my middle into three parts, and my ending into three parts. I already knew that I had to find out about the crime, investigate the crime, and then solve the crime, but how could I split finding out about a crime into three parts? Investigating a crime into three parts? Solving a crime into three parts? Well that’s where my creative side came in. Each third became it’s own beginning, middle, and end.

I added character development, conflicts, and plot twists to fill the gaps, otherwise it’d be a three-chapter book. Maybe it takes three problems and two solutions to fully discover that a crime was committed. Maybe it takes a leap of faith, three lucky tip-offs, and two steps backward to get through the investigation. Maybe because of a new friendship and two minds working on the case, with a few cafe scenes here and there, the crime was finally solved. But the case is not closed until the criminal is caught, so there’s a few more scenes for ya’.

There are so many options that I had to split the thirds of the three into three parts themselves, resulting in 27 or so chapters. It allowed me to explore the characters with back stories, have intimate as well as action scenes, and really build a secret over time, which I had planted at the beginning of my plotting process. It sprouted into a drawn out sequence of events that became my book outline.

I hope that helped some with plotting your next mystery thriller!

Keep writing,

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

Avoiding Writer’s Block

Is improbable, but not impossible. What is writer’s block, first off?

If you’ve ever been clueless as to what to write, after you’ve started a project or began a different project, you’ve probably had writer’s block.

So to come up with a theory, I analyzed what happened before each time I had writer’s block. To start, whenever I couldn’t start a writing project because I didn’t know what to write about, my mind had been on other things. Secondly, right before I hit the writer’s block wall in my stories I had just finished writing the perfect sentence, paragraph, or chapter.

Here’s my theory: In order to make a book better, one has to edit. But why? Can’t you make it good the first time? No. You have to think about what’s good and what’s bad. Now, when I wrote the good stuff, it came from the heart. I was going by instinct as to what should be written. I was word drunk. Then, as you know, I’d hit a wall.

But that’s just it: I wasn’t thinking. I was rolling the words off my tongue. I wasn’t thinking ahead. It caused the next chapter’s quick finish, words thrown together to continue the story. It wasn’t good.

If you are a mastermind, thinking about every sentence, paragraph, chapter – planning way ahead – maybe you could skip editing your book and writer’s block all together.

However, for most people, we can’t predict how a chapter will turn out and we let our emotions run wild when we feel the passion. That can be dangerous, but it’s also why we write. We wouldn’t have any fun doing what we love if we had to think deeply about it all the time. Besides, editing could be a fun function of the whole bit, too.

Keep writing!

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

 

Sexuality In Books

Many books have sex, physical signs of affection, and sexual tension. As a writer, I want to know why we do this, how can and how much can it help the book, and are there downsides.

The downsides:

  • As a writer, one should write what they love and express most comfortably. One does not write well in a genre they are not interested in. Figuring out if you’re a sexual writer is very simple. Do the movies, books, and shows you love so much have sexual innuendos and intimate scenes? Then you’ll probably do well. If not, I’m going to guess you’re not going to write very strong tension, if you are at all.
  • There are quite a lot of people out there that are prudent when it comes to sex as a topic of choice. They stay clear of it and might even disgrace your book if it contains that kind of imagery or dialogue. Write what you want, though. They don’t matter if that’s what you’re interested in writing about.

The upsides:

  • Especially if you are writing in teen fiction, you’ll want to have sexuality present in your books. Most publishing houses label young adult books as novels that explore the aspects of adulthood, breaking into topics like sex, drugs, bullying and pop culture. It’s what they’ve been forbidden to read, so teens read it the most. Most other adult genres have sexuality, as well.
  • It can make the book more relatable. Sexuality does exist in the real world, and, where appropriate, an author should address the subject as realistically and reliably as possible. It brings realism and a stronger emotion to the story you’re writing.

How should you write sexuality into your book?

Depending on how you look at sex, you could include physical contact in your book: kissing, caressing hands, intercourse, etc. You can be more or less descriptive, telling readers exactly what’s going on second by second, or hint to a scene that the readers never see. Then again, you can avoid the matter entirely.

You can use it as a detail instead of a plot movement. Maybe you just want the boy to kiss his girlfriend on the cheek. It doesn’t mean anything for the story, other than to show the boy continues to care for his girl. You could also, romance writers, use it as a plot or turning point. Ex: The princess loves her rescuer, but she better not kiss him before she gets back to her soon-to-be-husband prince, or there might not be a coming back.

If you want to write the best sexual tension, keep the suspense long and agonizing, make the main character’s love interest as mysterious as possible for as long as possible, and write the MC meeting the love interest in the same age bracket as your potential audience. It’s automatically more relatable, and not everyone has known their love interest their whole life.

But there have been books where the MC was dead, and it still got pretty steamy. So write what you want to write, bottom line. If you’re hearts in it, the writing will present exactly what you want your readers to receive.

That’s my intake on the whole sexuality-in-books thing. What’s yours?

Keep writing,

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

Writing Beginnings To Your Books

I wanted to do a “How To Make Your Book’s Ending Unrushed” post, but I decided to do one on book beginnings instead. Almost every book on Amazon.com gives an excerpt of their first few pages. If they don’t, that’s probably a sign that the book has a bad beginning.

My hypothesis: Beginnings should make a reader curious. It’s not always cliché to start with an eerie lead and loose facts to get a reader going. I’ve switched my chapters’ order so many times to fit this. I finally decided to take the easy way out and pick the one with the most action to start the book. Although, the first time I wrote it, that’s not at all how it started in my head. Is that okay or am I betraying my story? Is it action or curiosity that reels in readers? Here are the beginnings to other books I’ve read so we can begin to figure that out. My research:

Looking for Alaska, by John Green:

  • Does it have action? No, in the next chapter he arrives at his boarding school. The first chapter revolves around Pudge and the reason he is going to a private school.
  • Is there curiosity? Yes, by giving Pudge purpose to go, we want to see if going to a private school will pan out the way he wants it to.

Thirteen Reasons Why, by Jay Asher:

  • Does it have action? No, in the next chapter, a box of tapes arrived at a boy’s door step and really starts the story. The first chapter is the aftermath of what has happened. It’s very unclear.
  • Is there curiosity? Yes, we are immediately interested in the boy’s purpose; why he’s acting to such degrees of importance and what events cause this. There is clearly need to know.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, by J.K. Rowling:

  • Does it have action: Yes and no. No fighting or chase scenes if that’s what you meant. Yes, we follow characters other than the main one around. There is contrast between them and wizards looming around the muggle world. It’s not until chapter four that we actually enter the wizard world.
  • Is there curiosity? Yes, the first chapter refers to some event that happened before this new story begins. We also want to know what is going to happen to this poor baby that has been given to a mean bunch of people he’ll have to call family.

The Coldest Girl in Coldtown, by Holly Black:

  • Is there action? Yes? The MC wakes up in a bathtub after she’d drank too much the night before, only to find the rest of the partygoers are dead in the other room. She explores.
  • Is there curiosity? Yes, we immediately want to know how everyone died and how she survived. It sounds cliché, but only if you write it just like that. Holly Black used detail to mask many clichés.

The Merchant of Death, by D. J. MacHale:

  • Is there action? Sort of. Bobby is writing in past tense through a letter about leaving a pretty girl at his house to go someplace unknown with his uncle.
  • Is there curiosity? Yes, we know something has gone horribly wrong by the urgency and confusion Bobby speaks in. We also immediately want to know where his uncle takes him and why he’s acting this way.

Well, it looks like the beginning of my story can have action, but what’s most important (and I should mention the books I’ve chosen above are one’s I’d recommend to others) is that it entices the reader’s curiosity. Possibly create a purpose or a goal, or maybe rewrite the beginning in a way where the end of the story comes first so the reader wants more. Putting contrast between different characters or between how one usually acts and how they’re acting while in danger would both work. If you have many of these in many chapters, which one would create the most curiosity placed at the beginning? Go from there.

Thanks for reading,

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

Another Traditional VS Self-Publishing Blog

There’s a blog I recently read of an author’s (I’ll link it right here). Back in 2009, this author tracked his eBooks, both self-published and traditionally published, on Kindle. He compared his pricings over a six month period and here’s what his statistics showed.

Traditional Published

Sell eBook at $4, sell 550 copies, get $340

Sell eBook at $6, sell 200 copies, get $600

Sell eBook at $8, sell 150-180 copies, get $340-380

The author was paid per eBook from his publisher, who was paid by Amazon. Amazon made a profit, so his publisher got a fraction, and the author got a fraction of that fraction, ranging from 3 cents to $3 per book. No real promise there.

Self-Published

The author sold his eBooks at $2 and got anywhere from $630 to $3600 for each book. That beats every category of traditional publishing. It’s because Amazon promised 35% royalty for self-published eBooks. He states that he would’ve made $15,000 more if he had his other books under his self-published name during that six-month period. That’s incredible.

But I wanted to revamp this blog for it’s almost a decade old, and I’d like to point out an even better advantage to using Kindle Self-Publishing. They now offer 70% royalties with some drawbacks; you have to restrain from selling your eBook over $9.99 (if you sell under the usual 35% royalty, this doesn’t apply; you can go up to $200) and no less than $1.99 (if you sell under the 35% you can sell it under that). Also, if you want to sell your hardcover copy, it must be 20% greater than the price of the eBook, at least.

If this author had 70% royalty back in 2009 (through traditional publishing, we knew the sweet spot was $6 per eBook for him anyway) he could’ve sold each of his eBooks at $6, sold his hardbacks for $7.50, and would’ve been losing a lot more than $15,000. Just saying.

What do you guys think? Thanks for reading! I have to get back to my little writing sprints now.

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

Kindle Worlds: A Way To Finally Pay FanFic Writers

I wanted to wait a bit before talking about Kindle Worlds. It was introduced to Amazon on May 22, 2013, and today’s date is September 22, 2014, meaning it’s been exactly four months. But I’m glad I did so to prove a point. Here’s my opinion on the matter.

ANOTHER FANFIC SITE

Or is it? I thought the idea of making a profitable fanfic site was outstanding, since this is the first one that pays their authors for writing. If you have ever come across a fan fiction on the internet, know they’re no profitable (until now) royalties involved. Fanfics are based off someone else’s story.

A 35% royalty rate is what Amazon Worlds is offing now, which I think is completely fair! I’ll stand beside that. Most complaints gear toward “not having enough worlds,” or “not having enough royalties.” Woh! Remember, Amazon Worlds has the highest paying royalties for fanfics, because everything else is free! Outside of Amazon Worlds, Amazon Self Publishing is still one of the highest, with 70% royalties! But this will be important down below.

So, you still aren’t with me on the 35% royalties? Let’s say you publish your fan fiction using new names and settings so it looks different and can be sold as an original piece. Guess what? 70% is coming your way, but where’s the audience? Hope you have one. And for those of you who are using the site to get big, is that really the best decision? Fan fiction? WE WILL KNOW, STOP USING THE SYSTEM!!

Within the last four months, I’ve seen the site grow; only having three or four fandoms at first, Amazon Worlds broadened into a nice twenty or so to date. They started with Vampire Diaries and are building to worlds like Kurt Vonnegut’s. You know what else I’ve seen grow? The size of readers! Yes! Four months later, we are seeing amazing results from readership (true fans, so expect hard criticism where fakers lurk).

Readers, that’s right, there are people writing the actual ending of your favorite fandom that you wanted all along. But wait. Your fandom is not up yet? Maybe if Amazon Worlds had more money …they could get contracts with Disney and J.K. Rowling. …Maybe that’s why the royalties are so low for fan writers! They need investments to get the readers and fanfic writers what they want!

It’s 40% less royalties than if one published under the regular Amazon publishing, but that’s probably because 1. One can’t take ALL the credit for someone else’s work! It’s someone else’s work! And 2. Some of that missing 40% has to go toward building the site to becoming a better fandom site.

I am all aboard for Amazon Worlds. I can’t wait to write my own fan fic (my first actually). I’m just waiting for the right fandom to come along.

Those of you authors that are writing stories just to broaden your audience without knowledge of the fandom, shame on you. It’s a good idea, because I totally see this site taking off in the next few months and traffic is going to gear toward stories that were on longer with more views, but still. Genuine fans only. Stop trying to be something you’re not. Lying’s bad. And we’ll know, trust me. The moment you slip up on your facts, we’ll know.

Thank’s for reading!

P.S. And before you ask, to make your work a world on Amazon, you already have to have a HUGE audience. Not the other way around. Cheers!

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime