Pen Names: What Are They and How To Use Them


This blog was written by me, but inspired by my fans’ comments on my YouTube video, NaNoWriMo Publishing Edition: Day 24.

So what is a pen name? If you’re curious what a pen name is, or sometimes referred to as a pseudonym, they’re names on works that hide identities, organize works into groups, used as a marketing strategy – they’re used for all sorts of things!

Maybe your genre doesn’t match with what name you’re writing under. Rainbow Rowell wouldn’t be found on a horror novel. Maybe R. Rowell would be preferred. This is a marketing strategy. The author still wants to put their books under the same name, but they switch around how they spell out or initial their name on the cover to better fit the genre.

Some people want privacy. Maybe Rainbow Rowell isn’t her name at all. Maybe she’s writing horrors and romances under this fake name so her family doesn’t know her secret fascination with fictional characters. This is still a nice strategy, even when matching names with genres – because you can still change from using initials to full names. It’s just not your real name.

There’s something about being unable to sign your real name on the book cover that is so heartbreaking for some. But deciding on your name is something I would consider at the beginning of your career, before you release anything. Once you start on a path, like using your real name, it’s hard to use anything else. You can, but it’s like starting over, because you’re basically being labeled as a new author.

One of my published fans told me he wrote in pen names. He used totally different names for different genres and got less revenue from that because fans didn’t know the books were written by the same person, so there was a marketing rift.

One fan said she could never use her real name, afraid her family might find out. But from what I can gather, she is still publishing under that name and has made a decent amount of success from it. She was consistent in using the same name, even if it wasn’t her real one.

A few other reasons you might want to use a pen name is because your name is too long, or your name is hard to pronounce, or it reads wrong in translation. I met a waiter once who called himself Erin, because people couldn’t pronounce his real name, Eran with a squiggle over the “a.”

So consider your situation, what you’re writing, and what you’re comfortable with. You never have to use your real name. You don’t have to use your real name or always use your fake name. But you can if that is what you’d rather do. You can use abbreviations or initials.

What I can gather from the comments is that “your name is your brand,” and to build your brand, you should try to keep your name(s) as consistent as possible. The route I’m going to take with my books is to use my real name and mess around with initials when I write a completely different genre. Mainly, I’m going to look at the cover and ask, “Will they take my book seriously with that name on there?” If I think it’s fine, I’ll leave it. It all comes down to the cover for me.

Thanks for reading guys!

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

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The Difference Between Thriller and Horror

To write a good horror or thriller, I want to point out the similarities that they both have that make them good stories.

A thriller and a horror both have a lot of action in them. Both use unusual circumstances to entertain the audience. The reader is enthralled by the story because they’re picturing themselves in these unlikely situations. It’s a second-hand experience of something entirely new at a safe distance.

Getting to the point of this post, what are the differences.

Thrillers thrill us, sending us through a roller-coaster of nonstop emotion. One moment, the characters are in a bad scenario, the next moment they’re in an even worse one. It takes a heck of a lot of quick thinking to get them out of trouble. Basically, there are so many unexpected twists and turns that your brain has no time to keep up, so it just sits back and enjoys the ride for what it is. That’s why most thrillers can come off as written and plotted brilliantly, because no one could’ve expected the outcome. It’s actually just hiding facts until they absolutely must be revealed.

Horrors horrify us. There is one emotion that this genre usually focuses on, and that’s fright. There’s a mix of disgust and suspense in there, but mainly it wants us to either instinctively shield our eyes or scream out-loud to ourselves. Horror has to be creative with it’s plot, too, presenting a situation that no person would wish on another. Gruesome images, whether it be gore or the next variation of scary eyes and teeth, are there to haunt your thoughts at night.

Those are the essential differences. A good thriller will have you thinking about those plot twists long after the story ends, and a good horror will have its images and/or scenarios.

Thanks for reading,
WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

How To Plot Out A Thriller/Mystery

A year ago, I plotted out my own little mystery thriller and hope to make it into a book one day. I enjoyed the scheming and implanting surprises. So here’s how I did it.

I knew I could complete a story in as many chapters as I needed. However, I didn’t have a story yet. So I thought I’d see what I could come up with in 27 chapters (3x3x3). I didn’t end up using all of them, but it did get the ball rolling

I came up with my ending first. What did I want to accomplish? What emotional state was each character going to be in?

I worked backward. I felt like my beginning should be the exact opposite. I wanted a story where my characters were heroic and loving at the end and lame and hateful at the beginning. I wanted there to be two main characters who grow closer throughout the book.

I had a beginning, a middle, and an end: boring and strangers, action and comrades, heroes and friends.

Then I decided what kind of action: do I want it to be a crime? A jungle adventure? A spy undercover operation? The list goes on. I thought a crime would be interesting. Multiple crimes, in fact.

So, I split my beginning into three parts, my middle into three parts, and my ending into three parts. I already knew that I had to find out about the crime, investigate the crime, and then solve the crime, but how could I split finding out about a crime into three parts? Investigating a crime into three parts? Solving a crime into three parts? Well that’s where my creative side came in. Each third became it’s own beginning, middle, and end.

I added character development, conflicts, and plot twists to fill the gaps, otherwise it’d be a three-chapter book. Maybe it takes three problems and two solutions to fully discover that a crime was committed. Maybe it takes a leap of faith, three lucky tip-offs, and two steps backward to get through the investigation. Maybe because of a new friendship and two minds working on the case, with a few cafe scenes here and there, the crime was finally solved. But the case is not closed until the criminal is caught, so there’s a few more scenes for ya’.

There are so many options that I had to split the thirds of the three into three parts themselves, resulting in 27 or so chapters. It allowed me to explore the characters with back stories, have intimate as well as action scenes, and really build a secret over time, which I had planted at the beginning of my plotting process. It sprouted into a drawn out sequence of events that became my book outline.

I hope that helped some with plotting your next mystery thriller!

Keep writing,

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

Avoiding Writer’s Block

Is improbable, but not impossible. What is writer’s block, first off?

If you’ve ever been clueless as to what to write, after you’ve started a project or began a different project, you’ve probably had writer’s block.

So to come up with a theory, I analyzed what happened before each time I had writer’s block. To start, whenever I couldn’t start a writing project because I didn’t know what to write about, my mind had been on other things. Secondly, right before I hit the writer’s block wall in my stories I had just finished writing the perfect sentence, paragraph, or chapter.

Here’s my theory: In order to make a book better, one has to edit. But why? Can’t you make it good the first time? No. You have to think about what’s good and what’s bad. Now, when I wrote the good stuff, it came from the heart. I was going by instinct as to what should be written. I was word drunk. Then, as you know, I’d hit a wall.

But that’s just it: I wasn’t thinking. I was rolling the words off my tongue. I wasn’t thinking ahead. It caused the next chapter’s quick finish, words thrown together to continue the story. It wasn’t good.

If you are a mastermind, thinking about every sentence, paragraph, chapter – planning way ahead – maybe you could skip editing your book and writer’s block all together.

However, for most people, we can’t predict how a chapter will turn out and we let our emotions run wild when we feel the passion. That can be dangerous, but it’s also why we write. We wouldn’t have any fun doing what we love if we had to think deeply about it all the time. Besides, editing could be a fun function of the whole bit, too.

Keep writing!

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

 

The Acknowledgments Section

An acknowledgments section is somewhat of a dedication, but not the dedications section, where you list who and how certain people influence or inspired you to write your book. (The dedication section is the small page after that says things like “to my children,” end.)

Include everyone who you want to thank in helping create your novel. In other words, without them, there would be something lost or missing in your book.

You can start with more formal thanks or begin with people who supported you for free.

Formal names are your publisher, book editor, cover design, and anyone else you paid to create your book. They’re just as important as the people who supported you for free. It doesn’t matter what order you name them in.

Where do you put it and how long should it be?

You can put it at the front. This shows you’re acknowledged how important they are by placing them first in the book.

You can put it at the back. Some eBooks instead have their forward or acknowledgment section at the back, so the reader can jump right into the story with no distractions. It’s a marketing technique.

Either way, the best acknowledgements are the ones that are full pages long. One page or two proves how much you appreciate your supports. Who’s going to believe a one lined thank you? That’s almost a dedication! You should always explain why you’re thanking them and what they are to you!

How to acknowledge creatively:

Be yourself. How would you speak to the people you are acknowledging? This section is for them after all, and you want it to sound natural.

Be funny. Where it fits, if you have an inside joke that you’d like to bring up for old time sakes, do it! They are hilarious to read!

Bring out the poet in you. If that’s what it takes to express your gratitude, then so be it. Tell them that they were the stem to your delicate flower.

Have variety. Mix serious with casual. You can stick to the serious mode if you want, but the more heart-felt it is, the more believable it’ll sound. If you’re just a serious person all around, then maybe write it that way.

If anyone helped you FINANCIALLY pay for your book, it’s especially important to list them here. No exceptions.

This is their place to shine! Have fun with it!

Keep writing,

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

Writing Readers Will Enjoy

 

When you first start writing a novel, you’re writing a story that follows a character or multiple characters; generally, you’re writing from your own head in expressing immediate ideas and observations that you see your characters experiencing. You try to be detailed as possible. Even though it’s told behind the eyes of characters in your book, it’s still considered your diary, because only you understand it’s depth.

Because this isn’t “The Diary of Anne Frank,” a nonfiction written by a girl for herself, you should consider your reader’s perspective on the story. To do this, you take your raw “diary” format of your story and revise it and take it to an editor. The goal is to avoid “Why did this happen?” Or “why did they do that?” Or even “this relationship is fake.”

You can add and change things for the readers so they can understand what you mean. Writers take many years to perfect their novels, gearing them toward their audience. However, when authors go under contract and are asked to kick out a book every year, this sometimes takes away from the process. The “diary” format within the year-old story is more raw than it should be, and it irritates the reader when not clarified.

Actions speak louder than words. Everything your character says in dialogue will be trumped by your character’s actions. The only thing that can trump actions is a character’s thoughts:

Be brutally honest. If you can’t think of what your characters are thinking at that moment, try to relate to them on an emotional level. If they’re feeling confused, write something like, “I have no clue why that happened,” after the character has happy dialogue with someone else. Maybe the character is feeling nervous, but their actions are jumpy and vibrant. Directly after you say, “They raced to the pole to see who could get there quicker,” write a thought like,” I should be at home taking care of Jesse.” Even if your actions, dialogue, and thoughts all have the same feeling, your readers will still appreciate your character, relating to them more then that they’re confident in what they’d suspected was true. Even if your readers can’t relate to the actions or dialogue your characters make, there will still be some sympathy toward their thoughts.

Tip: If you want an even more realistic story, think about how your other characters are feeling as your main character is off observing and feeling by themselves. If one character is away being stressed, how will they react to your character that is happy when they come together in the next chapter?

 

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

Novels Need Vocabulary

On a daily basis, I look up new words that I don’t understand or want to use. I utilize at least one of the five or so within the week and usually forget the rest.

But I’ve noticed when I don’t try to learn new words at all, I don’t speak any better than I did before.

****

I made a goal to widen my vocabulary after finishing my manuscript’s first draft. I needed to give my book space for about a month or two, but in the meantime I should learn new words and their definition. Succinct: to the point, with no words wasted. Using broader verbs and adjectives improves the lines and makes shorter, briefer points with added punch.

I learned one word a day for a month, forcing myself to use each in a sentence for practice. I tried to read the “word of the day” from websites, apps, etc., but they weren’t sticking. What really helped was writing them down. I made it personal. I picked my own words, wrote them down, found their synonyms, connected with their definitions, and used them in a sentence. It was an addiction. This is a dictionary and I could publish it, I thought. I wouldn’t and didn’t go on to do that, but it felt like I’d made something brilliant: A personal journal/dictionary with only the best words and all their definitions. Memorization came easily.

To make your work sound ten times better, write down words you don’t know and learn about them. You’ll find when you go back through your first draft, you’ll be changing the “he said quietly,” to “he muttered.” You’ll see your “written scribbles on the board,” turn into “the board’s griffonage.”

Your manuscript will become the children’s, young adult, or adult novel it strives to be. Broadened vocabulary does define a book. If you’re going for a young adult novel, transforming verbs with adverb into powerful, independent verbs makes the rift that separates children’s books from young adult. Keep this in mind when your lines sound bland and prosaic.

Even if four of five words seem unusable, one should stick, and that every day for a year stacks up to a benevolent masterpiece.

Keep writing,

WritingMime

P.S. Here’s Word Of The Day‘s channel on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUgrpy80LgnpC8FY8XnWE2g

 

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

Pulling Readers Into Your Chapters

There are too many chapters that start with the same thing. Names. Person doing something.

Every time I open up Critique Circle, I’m looking through the list and seeing the first sentence of each story that I could potentially leave feedback for. They all start like this:

  • LUCY and Melinda promenaded onto the dance floor, a high paced song was on and they started doing the Charleston, the latest dance craze.”
  • ” “It’s Mrs. Douglas. She’s in the hospital.” Anita wiped her eyes and whispered. “They don’t know what’s wrong.” “
  • “Released from the hospital on Sunday, seven days after she entered, Betty Jane’s life returned to normal. She was back at work on Tuesday, tired, but glad to see her coworkers.”

To be clear, these aren’t first chapters. This is how people start their second, third, fourth, and every chapter after that.. which is disappointing.

I get excited when I know my chapters are written well. I believe people put their separate chapters on the internet when they know they could do better. Sometimes, I read chapters that talk about what a character felt when something was happening, not what they’re feeling as it’s happening. Look at your fifth chapter. The beginning is like: A few weeks later, everything was back to normal. This happened, and this happened. These are the concepts that hold true to me, which is why it happened. But anyway, now.. ..Memoirs are fun, but done wrong can be boring.

To fix this, ask yourself, are you telling like it’s happening, or like it already happened? (It doesn’t matter if it DID happen in the past. How are you TELLING it?)

Does the chapter start with an immediate thing: how you’re feeling physically or what you’re seeing at that moment? Ex: It was cold on the bus, and the trees flew by the window. New paragraph. I was on a school trip heading to

Always speak in immediacy of what’s happening when starting a chapter.

People aren’t treating their chapters like wonderful, beautiful things. An exception to this is the book’s first chapter. If every chapter was treated like it was the first, the book would be more successful. You know for a fact that your editor might cut a few chapters out and a different chapter might end up as your first anyway, so why not save yourself the trouble? If someone started reading your book from the first paragraph of chapter five, would they continue reading.

Unsuccessful books have too many chapters that start with people doing stuff. One single sentence of a tiny bit of world building would be preferred. Switch it up. If your chapter will eventually describe a beautiful atmosphere, (after you talk about what the people are doing, right?) why not just skip over the people for a paragraph and start with a little hint of what that atmosphere is, if that’s the best part of the chapter. Give us a gripping image to pressure us to read on. You can go in depth on the imagery later.

So, my best advice to give is to pick the most enjoyable paragraph that you wrote in the chapter (it doesn’t have to be the most exciting or involving plot. Describing the forest was the most enjoyable, so make a reference to the forest. Remember, if you’re feeling the writing, the readers are feeling the reading.) Place a common image related to it at the beginning of the chapter. A location or image will do. I’m not saying to use foreshadow or anything like that to predict an outcome. Do that as you please. Finally, ask yourself the questions highlighted above that are related to immediacy. These sort of questions get your brain moving and can get you unstuck in the most stickiest brainfarts.

Thanks for reading,

WritingMime

 

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

 

Writing Programs (Camp NaNoWriMo Inspired)

In the spirit of Camp NaNoWriMo this April, I’ve decided to conduct a study over the different programs that writers used throughout the month.

I personally love to use WordPad because it does not alert me when I made a mistake, which is vital during the month of NaNo. It shuts off my inner editor and lets me write in peace. Even the word count is hidden, so I have to use wordcounter.net to check my status after a long day’s work. It’s an app that comes with computers nowadays, a simplified version of Microsoft Word. Check your computer before you settle for NotePad, because most likely you will have a form of it.

Obviously you could pay for Microsoft Word if you prefer that. You can highlight the part of the book you’ve written that day and see the word count at the bottom. You can turn off spell check while you’re writing and then at the end of the day, with your daily work goal done, check through the mistakes.

Another common program used is Scrivener. It’s an auto-save writing pad, chapter organizer, and sticky note combined. I like to use it whenever I’m writing outlines. It has a “pin board” where you can move index cards around until they fit perfectly in order; wonderful for taking notes, as well. This program does cost money; however, for the first month, everyone gets a 30-day free trial. So, I like to download it right before NaNoWriMo.

StoryMill can be downloaded for free and looks almost exactly like Scrivener. It’s geared specifically to story building and has sections for your characters, settings, scenes to be place along with other neat features.

Yarny is free and is an online site that auto saves every few words, so you don’t lose anything. You can have multiple novels, set word count goals, and not to mention separate your chapters for easy viewing/sharing. On the right side of the screen, there are three sections: people, places, and things. You make “snippets,” which help organize your ideas and character profiles. Although this seems complicated, it is very similar to the features available in the program Scrivener, but it’s free and online! I like it because I have everything in one place and don’t have to worry about losing anything since it’s not on my hard drive. Plus, you’re able to share with friends easily; just send them a link!

 

One final program I’d like to mention is something called Write or Die 2 (the older brother of Write or Die). It’s not very conventional if you take long spans of time to write out a single sentence, but those of us doing NaNoWriMo find it much more useful. Basically, if you stop writing, your words slowly delete themselves. You can set the sensibility to high, where not writing for just a few seconds will result in a lot of work lost. But on a low setting, it’s just enough motivation to keep you writing without giving yourself a mild heart attack before finishing your word goal.

I hope you guys found this article useful and check out a few of the links. They’re some of my favorite to use during NaNo.

Keep writing,

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

Writing Tools: Foreshadow and Creative Recap

Lately, I’ve been studying the ends and beginnings of novel chapters. To begin a study session, I first must be inspired by something I like, and then notice what I dislike in comparison. I formulate a generic do’s and don’ts list from there, and then I proceed to write about it. This week, I really, really want to point out how authors flow from one chapter to the next.

For starters, I’ll begin with a literary tool called foreshadowing. By definition, the verb foreshadow means to signal that something is going to happen. When used as a writing tool, the author is either using it to progress the plot or to creating anticipation. Quite literally, foreshadowing can be stating that something is going to happen in the next chapter, without hinting to what that is. For example, the end of a chapter can say, “But Billy could not have been prepared for what was coming next.” If the author did not tell us the readers what is coming, then we are just as clueless as Billy. This is exactly a signal that something is going to happen, or a promise that the plot is going to be moving in the next chapter. Total cluelessness can get the heart thumping, for those who love writing suspense novels (hint hint).

Less literally, the author could say, “But Billy could never have guessed what he’d find in the closet.” This is a signal that something is going to happen, but it also hints to what that is, which in this case is Billy opening the closet and then reacting to what he finds. This gets the brain moving, and depending on the circumstance, can also get the heart racing. But usually the reader is, or trying to, deduct what is in the closet, adding their own emotions besides suspense caused by what they think is going to happen, such as fright, sadness, excitement; it’s like a reader’s DIY emotional roller coaster.

Foreshadowing always comes before something in which the reader does not know yet. If the book jumps back and forth between times, one cannot use foreshadowing to speak of a future, when in the previous chapter the event already happened and the reader is all-knowing, the characters are not. You’re explains in a foreshadow way what the reader already knows. That’s a form of creative recap, but we’ll get back to that later.

Mostly, foreshadowing is placed before something happens. It could be seconds before, or years before the event. Foreshadowing chapter-wise, the event it’s referring to could be placed directly at the start of the next chapter, which would be considered a fast-paced novel, or it could be put aside until later chapters, letting readers either forget about it or pick up pieces in the meanwhile.

A book doesn’t need heavy foreshadowing if the book is written for a day-to-day, contemporary premise. It’s not meant to be suspenseful. Creative recap, however, is necessary.

Creative recap is reconditioning/rewriting an event in past tense for repetitive emphasis. The importance of repeating yourself, reminding the reader who did what and what happened when, is like playing with flashcards, allowing the readers quick and easy assess to the past when you want them to remember something. Repeating names at the beginning of novels so they start to stick is an example. Though, we do it in a creative way that the reader will enjoy instead of just saying it. Hence why we call it creative recap. Another plus is that it helps connect the chapters through reference, and a general understanding of why each chapter is there builds over time.

An example of creative recap: “While that was happening, this was happening here,” or, “Only five years after this happened, this was happening here.” A simple statement of relationship in the first sentence of each chapter will fill in those holes. As a result, the readers won’t need to think too hard about the distance and time between them. Even if the chapters are almost completely unrelated to one another, it’s still easier for the readers with that connection.

When I mentioned before about some books going out of order, you cannot foreshadow if the reader already knows what’s going to happen. In this situation, “But Billy could never have guessed what he’d find in the closet,” turns into recap since nothing is hidden from the reader anymore. It’s there to repeat the knowledge, for emphasis. For the readers, it’s an instruction to start feeling a certain way, reminding them of what they already felt. It’s creative, because you’re not outwardly saying, “Remember this?” It’s more of a reference, a nudge-nudge, inside joke sort of thing.

Whenever you catch yourself thinking, “How can I make sure the reader picks this detail up,” or, “I haven’t mentioned this in a while, so how should I mention it again,” you’re probably using creative recap. You don’t want to outwardly say it, but you’re thinking hard about a creative way to do it. What ever you wrote as a solution is your prime example of creative recap.

There are many ways to go about creating creative recap, and there are just as many for foreshadowing. Both can be used to your advantage when it comes to repetition, repetition being the key to success. Because both are references technically, using either one will act as a second mentioning besides the actual telling of what will or what has happened. Use them as tools to improve your writing. In particular, use them to help your reader understand what’s going on in your book, unlike the metaphors and detail outfit descriptions in which build the pretty of your novel.

(P.S. Did you see what I did there with the colors? That’s a creative way of reminding you what I was referring to earlier, connecting the paragraphs, and making it easier to follow what I wanted to explain. c; I love creative recap.)

Thanks for reading,

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime