Writing Readers Will Enjoy

 

When you first start writing a novel, you’re writing a story that follows a character or multiple characters; generally, you’re writing from your own head in expressing immediate ideas and observations that you see your characters experiencing. You try to be detailed as possible. Even though it’s told behind the eyes of characters in your book, it’s still considered your diary, because only you understand it’s depth.

Because this isn’t “The Diary of Anne Frank,” a nonfiction written by a girl for herself, you should consider your reader’s perspective on the story. To do this, you take your raw “diary” format of your story and revise it and take it to an editor. The goal is to avoid “Why did this happen?” Or “why did they do that?” Or even “this relationship is fake.”

You can add and change things for the readers so they can understand what you mean. Writers take many years to perfect their novels, gearing them toward their audience. However, when authors go under contract and are asked to kick out a book every year, this sometimes takes away from the process. The “diary” format within the year-old story is more raw than it should be, and it irritates the reader when not clarified.

Actions speak louder than words. Everything your character says in dialogue will be trumped by your character’s actions. The only thing that can trump actions is a character’s thoughts:

Be brutally honest. If you can’t think of what your characters are thinking at that moment, try to relate to them on an emotional level. If they’re feeling confused, write something like, “I have no clue why that happened,” after the character has happy dialogue with someone else. Maybe the character is feeling nervous, but their actions are jumpy and vibrant. Directly after you say, “They raced to the pole to see who could get there quicker,” write a thought like,” I should be at home taking care of Jesse.” Even if your actions, dialogue, and thoughts all have the same feeling, your readers will still appreciate your character, relating to them more then that they’re confident in what they’d suspected was true. Even if your readers can’t relate to the actions or dialogue your characters make, there will still be some sympathy toward their thoughts.

Tip: If you want an even more realistic story, think about how your other characters are feeling as your main character is off observing and feeling by themselves. If one character is away being stressed, how will they react to your character that is happy when they come together in the next chapter?

 

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

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The Down-Low On Interesting Characters

Most of the time, writers don’t know how to go about making the fan-favorite character(s) readers remember for years. Don’t you worry because I’m here telling you today how to achieve just that by fixing one of the most obvious mistakes. Write active characters.

Here’s what you’ll want to do to make your character more involved with the plot. For starters, give your character(s) reason behind their actions. And a good reason. You can make a list of reasons and pull one from the hat, but the best reason, for your book will be the one that can impact the most readers, justify the action with great understanding, and portray a human’s impulsiveness (and if not human, a less human-y reason).

Also, ask yourself the question: is my character(s) acting or reacting? When your antagonist is more interesting to read about than your protagonist, you know there is something wrong. If you look very closely, you’ll notice that the bad guy is acting, doing evil because that’s the person they are, and moving about the story, while your good guy is just reacting, going after them, the defensive, protecting from what came and will go. This idea is more for middle school and elementary school grade readers.

Superman is not the hero he is today because he’s a man who wakes up and fights crime. He is the alien man who came from a faraway land, saddened by his grief, deserted on a planet which he has grown to love with people he’s grown to care about and he must save his new home from the terrible beings that have realistic motives to destroy the world. He looks for evil, using his news career (active), but most of the time he just stumbles across it (not active, and kind of cartoony-middle schoolish). Truthfully, if Superman didn’t have his bad guys, he’d be watching TV in his apartment.

Build the character. Use his actions at the beginning to demonstrate his strength, his weaknesses, and use them to foreshadow what he will be able to do and cannot do. Don’t tell but show us what he’s fond of and what he holds dear and what he has lost. It’s impressive to see the more creative parts of actions that tell a past. Try to expose what has happened using present actions.

Have more people reacting to them versus them reacting to others. Give them an audience and show how others treat them. If they are a normal run-of-the-mill person, describe the audience as people not looking at him, holding the door open for him out of courtesy, etc – after he walks up to the door and smiles at them. If he is a freak, the more instances where a person shuns him, flinching, calling him names, etc., will broaden the reaction to him acting weird. Do these reactions directly after his actions for the best effect. If he is just walking and people are “reacting to him” without visual reason, they are the one’s acting.

Make internal struggles strong. Discuss what’s going on inside in depth. Make sure the reader sees the pain this person is going through and their actions reflect their feelings. If they make a mistake because they over-thought something, or they didn’t think enough about and acted out of impulse, this is good. This shows the reader human-like flaws that they can relate to and feel bad for or excited for and etc. Mistakes are fine, but unexplainable, unreasoned actions are not.

Finally, this is a subliminal trick that will make your characters strong. Somewhere else in the book, have a polar opposite for each character so that the reader can subconsciously see the contrast that’s there. Even if they never meet, it still deepens the characters’ traits, and when they do meet, this opens many opportunities for actions and reactions between the two. That’s always an interesting thing to see.

I really enjoyed this one lecture from Brandon Sanderson’s vlog, hoping you all go check him out after this. He’s a college professor who films his class on a daily basis, so if you’re ever looking for more advice, there’s a bulk of it sitting around on his channel.

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

I’m So Excited, I Just Can’t Hide It!

Hello, my name is WritingMime and welcome to my blog!

I’m new to WordPress, or was when I first wrote this, so enjoy my first attempt at posting on the job.

This blog will be useful to those seeking advise on writing or the process of publishing. My experiences range from far to many, being an aspiring writer myself. I’ve critiqued other authors’ work, and have spent a lot of time researching the marketing business. I’ve written quite a few rough drafts of stories in my day and love to draw. Hopefully, I can put some of my own illustrations inside my books and on their covers one day!

In each of my posts, I’ll either be writing about what I’m working on, tips on drafting and revising, supplementary advice for a YouTube video I recently uploaded, or big news in the publishing community.

I hope to keep my readers enticed, with a bit of tomfoolery here and there, working to make better writers out of all of us! Always remember to have fun with it! And never stop writing, ’cause those words won’t write themselves!

Woot! We have a bright future ahead of us,

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/writingmime/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime