Monthly Archives: July 2016

Book Review: The Never War

Read in January, 2008 and Re-read in 2016

This third installment of the Pendragon series is another one of my favorites. I mean, it’s based off of 1930’s New York City! We got gangsters and flappers, one of my favorite times in American history. Of course, there are still out-worldly elements to the story because Bobby is a traveler.

I think in The Never War, Bobby really matures as a character. This is the territory, obviously, that strikes home with him, and because of that he realizes why it’s so important to protect Halla. I also think that Courtney and Mark’s characters (his two best friends who read his journals on Earth) are growing, which is refreshing.

About the series: I love that every single book adds more detail to the big list of rules for being a traveler. It makes the reader feel like they’re becoming a traveler themselves as they learn the ropes and the stakes of the game.

Although this could possibly be a stand-alone if you really wanted it to be, it’s even more enjoyable to read the series as a whole since there’s a bigger plot to uncover.

I gave D.J. MacHale’s The Never War a 5/5 stars, and if you want to read my review for book 1 or 2 I’ll leave the links here. My rating system is down below.

  • My rating system stands: 5/5 is a knock out of the park; this book deserves to be read by everyone. 4/5 is, “I really liked it,” but it did have a couple of kinks. 3/5 is, “I believe there are a lot of people who would enjoy this book, but for one reason or another, it didn’t sit well with me.” 2/5 is, “I really didn’t enjoy it and I’m not going to recommend it.” 1/5 is, “no one read this – throw it in a lake.”

Book Review: The Lost City of Faar

Read in January, 2008 and Re-read in 2015

The Lost City of Faar is the second installment in the Pendragon series, and one of my favorites. I’m sure after I first read book one, I begged my mom to buy me the second and third (because at the time, books were still coming out!). I probably sat down and read this one, Faar, in two or three sittings. All of these books are fast reads, I’m telling you.

The premise is just amazing in itself. It’s a world of water! Come on people! I love the details D.J. MacHale puts into his world building, from the transportation, to outfit choices, to set rules for being a “traveler” and how to act as a visitor on the current world, and the world’s creatures/enemies.

Again, without spoiling anything (because I’d absolutely hate to spoil my fave series), this installment has some amazing twists that you’ll never see coming. I didn’t, even the second time I read it – mainly because I forgot all the details. :/

I give The Lost City of Faar a 5/5. Rating system below. If you want to see my review for book 1 or 3, I’ll link it here.

  • My rating system stands: 5/5 is a knock out of the park; this book deserves to be read by everyone. 4/5 is, “I really liked it,” but it did have a couple of kinks. 3/5 is, “I believe there are a lot of people who would enjoy this book, but for one reason or another, it didn’t sit well with me.” 2/5 is, “I really didn’t enjoy it and I’m not going to recommend it.” 1/5 is, “no one read this – throw it in a lake.

Book Review: The Merchant of Death

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Read in January, 2008 and re-listened in 2014

I remember first reading this book in like 8th grade. My English teacher looked me in the eyes and told me I’d love this book. “Just read it” basically, in a time when I didn’t read at all. It was my Twilight to most other young teens of my age, by which I mean it kick started all the love I have for books today.

So I didn’t really know what to expect starting this book or series. I might’ve read the back when I first got it, but that’s about it. So I would suggest about the same for you if you are thinking about reading this. The Merchant of Death opens with action, and every chapter after is also filled with action. I never wanted to put it down.

I didn’t get the feeling that this book was for younger kids the first time I read it. I recently re-listened to it on audiobook (which I highly discourage because it makes every word of it sound cheesy), and still imagined the words the way I first read them. It’s the perfect first installment for the rest of the series.

The story is more about jumping into new worlds, not time travel, although it does do that at least once in the third book. If you read the series, you will be exploring new worlds you never thought existed all the while figuring out a twisted plot that isn’t revealed until the very end.

And again, I don’t think it is for kids. It says ages 11+, and there are some very violent scenes within it. I absolutely love MacHale’s writing style. He has this dramatic style about him, which is to be expected since he wrote screenplays for a few shows in the past.

Again, I really hope you read one of my favorite series by D.J. MacHale. I gave The Merchant of Death a 5/5 and if you find yourself disagreeing with this, I insist you read the next book, and the next. DON’T STOP! YOU WILL THANK ME. My grading system written below.

If you want to read my review for book 2 or 3, I’ll leave a link here.

  • My rating system stands: 5/5 is a knock out of the park; this book deserves to be read by everyone. 4/5 is, “I really liked it,” but it did have a couple of kinks. 3/5 is, “I believe there are a lot of people who would enjoy this book, but for one reason or another, it didn’t sit well with me.” 2/5 is, “I really didn’t enjoy it and I’m not going to recommend it.” 1/5 is, “no one read this – throw it in a lake.”

Book Review: Prodigy

Prodigy

Read from June 18 to July 23, 2016

Alright, I was going to give Prodigy by Marie Lu a four out of five stars because it did have a slow start, and I felt that the first book had a bit more action in each chapter. There was also three pages in the middle that totally confused me because I wasn’t sure who liked who in this situation.

But that all changed about half way through (not the confusing part, that was left a small mystery). I promise, keep reading. The entire second half of the book is so so so much better than the first book in the Legend series all together. It has earned its 4.5 stars. I want to jump right into the next one now. I just finished and my heart is racing. Obviously the only reason why I can’t give it a five out of five is because of that tiny bit above. My grading system is below.

If you’d like to read my review on the first book, Legend, I’ll share that here. I also finished the last book, Champion, which I will also leave my review for.

  • My rating system stands: 5/5 is a knock out of the park; this book deserves to be read by everyone. 4/5 is, “I really liked it,” but it did have a couple of kinks. 3/5 is, “I believe there are a lot of people who would enjoy this book, but for one reason or another, it didn’t sit well with me.” 2/5 is, “I really didn’t enjoy it and I’m not going to recommend it.” 1/5 is, “no one read this – throw it in a lake.”

WHAT IS LINE EDITNG, COPYEDITING, AND PROOFREADING?

So you’re no longer confused, and to prevent editor-to-author miscommunication, I’m here to explain the different types of edits: line, copy, and proof.

Line-editing

First, you want a line edit, the most important in my opinion. Whenever a friend reads a section from your book and gives you feedback, this is considered a very minor form of line editing. A line editor’s job is to tell you where there are plot holes and offer ideas on how to fix them. They’re most likely to tell you that eight of your chapters are unnecessary and that you should discard them. In other words, if you find a good line editor, they’ll get your plot in shape so no reader will want to put your book down. For good results, a moderate to intense line edit is needed while your book is in its early draft state.

Copy-editing

Second, you want a copy edit. Once your plot is the best it can be, you’ll want someone to check your sentence structures, a.k.a. your syntax, your grammar, spelling, etc., which is a copy editor’s job. There’s no minor, moderate, or intense form of copy editing, unless you count the instances where an editor points out a problem, such as the way you use the word there, once and never again. They’ll say something like, “I see that you use ‘there’ incorrectly many times in this chapter. Since there are so many, I wanted to make sure you were aware, but I don’t want to point all of them out.” This might be a moderate to minor copy edit if they do this for a lot of mistakes.

Proof-reading

Lastly, you want a proofread. Sometimes referred to as a proof editor, a proofreader reads the final stage of your draft to make sure everything sounds right. They are not expected to do hard editing of any kind. They’re basically beta readers, so don’t spend a ton of money on them when you can get fans or friends to read your manuscript for free.

Thanks for reading. I’ve wanted to make this kind of post for so long, but I never really knew the differences myself until recently.

Hope this helped,

WritingMime