Monthly Archives: April 2015

My BOOK TRAILER!! Remedy for Memory

Remedy for Memory’s synopsis:

After some time, I could talk to people, but I couldn’t say your name. I couldn’t put your name next to how I was feeling. There was something broken, and I just . . . didn’t think anyone could believe me.

So I wrote it down instead. I wrote this all for me . . . For you.”

If Trisha could summarize in one word her entire past relationship with Aaron, “The Baron,” it’d be a long, sarcastic “thanks.” For most of his life, Aaron Madison glorified being the butt of every joke, but after meeting Trisha four years ago, everything had changed.

If there was a time to speak, it was now.

Come watch my progress in publishing on my YouTube channel, where I’m uploading a four minute update video each day!! Remedy for Memory is coming out mid-May, before my birthday! NO, WAIT, IT’S OUT NOW: http://www.amazon.com/Remedy-Memory-Brista-Drake/dp/148396017X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1433606695&sr=8-1&keywords=brista+drake

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Twitter: https://twitter.com/WritingMime

Tumblr: http://writingmime.tumblr.com/

Other Blog: http://writingmime.blogspot.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

How To Write A Bio/Author’s Page

Conform to your genre. Write yourself as a character who would write in your book’s genre. If you’re writing a comedy, throw a few funny facts in about yourself. If you’re writing horror or thriller, keep it serious. Don’t write things like, “She finds her inspiration on long beaches,” because that’s what a romance writer might say in their bio section.

Don’t write in first or second person. Don’t write about yourself in a way that you are talking to the audience or you’re literally talking about yourself. Seem professional, like someone else wrote this for you, especially you self-published authors. It’s hard enough to seem legitimate.

Filter your facts. Speaking of seeming legitimate, don’t ramble on about your favorite bread of cat (unless you’re writing a book on cats). Facts that you’ll want to include are as followed:

  • Schools or classes you’ve attended for writing
  • How long you’re been writing
  • Mentions of other books of yours that fall in the same genre or close to
  • Links and other places to find your books (so if you write in other genres, as well, they can stumble upon them that way)

You want to seem like you take writing seriously, hence all the facts about writing. You of course are welcome to share basic facts that everyone should know, like where you were raised, or what inspires your writing the most. Keep it simple, though. The bio section isn’t this long resume of facts (unless you’re writing a book on how to write resumes).

Thanks for reading!

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Twitter: https://twitter.com/WritingMime

Tumblr: http://writingmime.tumblr.com/

Other Blog: http://writingmime.blogspot.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

Q & A! Publishing Edition!

Hi blog followers! Ready for a Q&A? So, as you already know, I’m publishing my book soon. I want to reach out to you and ask if you need me to go over anything with you. I’ve already covered a few topics and have linked the blogs beside them, but if you want more specific things answered or you’d like me to present the information in a new way, let me know!

I am going to be posting in the near future in the “Topics Coming” section. Ask me questions to answer now so I can address them then. Remember, I’m trying to teach people all about publishing, so even if it’s not a question, share with me your ideas so I can broadcast them to everyone!

Lastly, all the “Others” is topics I haven’t talked about. If you’d like to see a blog on the matter, let me know! Have any questions that are not on the list? Shout them out! All these bulletins are a template to guide you with your questions, not a list of commandments you must follow. Ask me anything relating to writing!

Topics Covered

Book Cover: https://writingmime.wordpress.com/2014/09/11/cover-design-for-self-published-books/

Editor: https://writingmime.wordpress.com/2014/05/03/how-to-find-proof-editors/

Acknowledgments: https://writingmime.wordpress.com/2015/04/18/the-acknowledgments-section/

eBook pricing: https://writingmime.wordpress.com/2014/11/20/another-traditional-vs-self-publishing-blog/

Book trailer: https://writingmime.wordpress.com/2013/09/09/what-makes-a-good-book-trailer/

Bio & Author page: https://writingmime.wordpress.com/2015/04/25/how-to-write-a-bioauthors-page/

Others

Synopsis

Title

Pre-order

Interior pictures

Author picture

Interior design

Formatting eBook

Writing advice

Translation

Printing draft

Post publishing specifics

Writing specifics

Q&A others

Thanks for your input!

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Twitter: https://twitter.com/WritingMime

Tumblr: http://writingmime.tumblr.com/

Other Blog: http://writingmime.blogspot.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

The Acknowledgments Section

An acknowledgments section is somewhat of a dedication, but not the dedications section, where you list who and how certain people influence or inspired you to write your book. (The dedication section is the small page after that says things like “to my children,” end.)

Include everyone who you want to thank in helping create your novel. In other words, without them, there would be something lost or missing in your book.

You can start with more formal thanks or begin with people who supported you for free.

Formal names are your publisher, book editor, cover design, and anyone else you paid to create your book. They’re just as important as the people who supported you for free. It doesn’t matter what order you name them in.

Where do you put it and how long should it be?

You can put it at the front. This shows you’re acknowledged how important they are by placing them first in the book.

You can put it at the back. Some eBooks instead have their forward or acknowledgment section at the back, so the reader can jump right into the story with no distractions. It’s a marketing technique.

Either way, the best acknowledgements are the ones that are full pages long. One page or two proves how much you appreciate your supports. Who’s going to believe a one lined thank you? That’s almost a dedication! You should always explain why you’re thanking them and what they are to you!

How to acknowledge creatively:

Be yourself. How would you speak to the people you are acknowledging? This section is for them after all, and you want it to sound natural.

Be funny. Where it fits, if you have an inside joke that you’d like to bring up for old time sakes, do it! They are hilarious to read!

Bring out the poet in you. If that’s what it takes to express your gratitude, then so be it. Tell them that they were the stem to your delicate flower.

Have variety. Mix serious with casual. You can stick to the serious mode if you want, but the more heart-felt it is, the more believable it’ll sound. If you’re just a serious person all around, then maybe write it that way.

If anyone helped you FINANCIALLY pay for your book, it’s especially important to list them here. No exceptions.

This is their place to shine! Have fun with it!

Keep writing,

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Twitter: https://twitter.com/WritingMime

Tumblr: http://writingmime.tumblr.com/

Other Blog: http://writingmime.blogspot.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

Sexuality In Books

Many books have sex, physical signs of affection, and sexual tension. As a writer, I want to know why we do this, how can and how much can it help the book, and are there downsides.

The downsides:

  • As a writer, one should write what they love and express most comfortably. One does not write well in a genre they are not interested in. Figuring out if you’re a sexual writer is very simple. Do the movies, books, and shows you love so much have sexual innuendos and intimate scenes? Then you’ll probably do well. If not, I’m going to guess you’re not going to write very strong tension, if you are at all.
  • There are quite a lot of people out there that are prudent when it comes to sex as a topic of choice. They stay clear of it and might even disgrace your book if it contains that kind of imagery or dialogue. Write what you want, though. They don’t matter if that’s what you’re interested in writing about.

The upsides:

  • Especially if you are writing in teen fiction, you’ll want to have sexuality present in your books. Most publishing houses label young adult books as novels that explore the aspects of adulthood, breaking into topics like sex, drugs, bullying and pop culture. It’s what they’ve been forbidden to read, so teens read it the most. Most other adult genres have sexuality, as well.
  • It can make the book more relatable. Sexuality does exist in the real world, and, where appropriate, an author should address the subject as realistically and reliably as possible. It brings realism and a stronger emotion to the story you’re writing.

How should you write sexuality into your book?

Depending on how you look at sex, you could include physical contact in your book: kissing, caressing hands, intercourse, etc. You can be more or less descriptive, telling readers exactly what’s going on second by second, or hint to a scene that the readers never see. Then again, you can avoid the matter entirely.

You can use it as a detail instead of a plot movement. Maybe you just want the boy to kiss his girlfriend on the cheek. It doesn’t mean anything for the story, other than to show the boy continues to care for his girl. You could also, romance writers, use it as a plot or turning point. Ex: The princess loves her rescuer, but she better not kiss him before she gets back to her soon-to-be-husband prince, or there might not be a coming back.

If you want to write the best sexual tension, keep the suspense long and agonizing, make the main character’s love interest as mysterious as possible for as long as possible, and write the MC meeting the love interest in the same age bracket as your potential audience. It’s automatically more relatable, and not everyone has known their love interest their whole life.

But there have been books where the MC was dead, and it still got pretty steamy. So write what you want to write, bottom line. If you’re hearts in it, the writing will present exactly what you want your readers to receive.

That’s my intake on the whole sexuality-in-books thing. What’s yours?

Keep writing,

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Twitter: https://twitter.com/WritingMime

Tumblr: http://writingmime.tumblr.com/

Other Blog: http://writingmime.blogspot.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

A Detailed Task List of Things Self-Published Authors Do

I do have similar posts like this, but not as detailed. Now that I’m going through the publishing process personally, there’s much more to share. The steps to self-publish my debut novel, Remedy for Memory:

Part One: Directly After Finishing Manuscript

  1. GET AN EDITOR. While you’re working on everything else, this’d be a good time to have someone finalizes your manuscript for you. (To make things easier, create your acknowledgments and bio sections for your book before this, so you can have them edited along with your manuscript.)
  2. Make a synopsis. Make many to give yourself options and ask friends, who’ve read your book, which one fits best.
  3. Create a title. You can’t advertise or make cover art without a title. Again, come up with lots of ideas to show friends. You should create more ideas for your title than cover art and synopses combined, because they’re much vaguer and could mean many things. Diverse options are best.
  4. Make a cover. You can’t start visually advertising without a cover.
  5. If you want a photo shoot for your bio picture, schedule this in advance. They’re much busier in the warm seasons.
  6. If you want a book signing, contact your book store ahead of time, too, for the same reasons.

Part Two: The In-Between

  1. You’ll want to work on multiple things at once when you’re not working on the beginning and end things. Formatting your interior – headings, footers, page numbers, and margins – can be done any time after completing your manuscript.
  2. Same with inserting pictures into your manuscript.
  3. And creating an eBook version of your book.
  4. Putting together a book trailer is optional, but if you want to make one, the process can take many days or many weeks, depending on the animation. Plan accordingly.

Part Three: The Product

  1. Now that you have a title, when you’re free, you can start sharing it! If you have a synopsis, start promoting it! Show off your cover! Mention it everywhere! Throw contests!
  2. Pre-Orders: The moment you come up with a title, you can set one up. Having a cover and synopsis is preferred. Making one a month before publishing is also favorable.
  3. Request a sample of your book the moment it’s ready. Check it for errors, inside and outside.
  4. Create an author’s page that’ll showcase your novels. Decorate your site with a profile picture and book cover.
  5. Price your book! You’re almost done; all you need now is prices for your book and eBook. Make the eBook cheaper than the printed copy, so it creates a demand while sitting next to a higher-priced printed version.
  6. If you’re planning to get a translation for your book, wait until your original has gone through the editor. No one wants a translation of poor words.

THEN, YOU’RE FINISHED! Travel the world now and meet all your wonderful fans!

Thanks for reading and keep writing,

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Twitter: https://twitter.com/WritingMime

Tumblr: http://writingmime.tumblr.com/

Other Blog: http://writingmime.blogspot.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

Writing Beginnings To Your Books

I wanted to do a “How To Make Your Book’s Ending Unrushed” post, but I decided to do one on book beginnings instead. Almost every book on Amazon.com gives an excerpt of their first few pages. If they don’t, that’s probably a sign that the book has a bad beginning.

My hypothesis: Beginnings should make a reader curious. It’s not always cliché to start with an eerie lead and loose facts to get a reader going. I’ve switched my chapters’ order so many times to fit this. I finally decided to take the easy way out and pick the one with the most action to start the book. Although, the first time I wrote it, that’s not at all how it started in my head. Is that okay or am I betraying my story? Is it action or curiosity that reels in readers? Here are the beginnings to other books I’ve read so we can begin to figure that out. My research:

Looking for Alaska, by John Green:

  • Does it have action? No, in the next chapter he arrives at his boarding school. The first chapter revolves around Pudge and the reason he is going to a private school.
  • Is there curiosity? Yes, by giving Pudge purpose to go, we want to see if going to a private school will pan out the way he wants it to.

Thirteen Reasons Why, by Jay Asher:

  • Does it have action? No, in the next chapter, a box of tapes arrived at a boy’s door step and really starts the story. The first chapter is the aftermath of what has happened. It’s very unclear.
  • Is there curiosity? Yes, we are immediately interested in the boy’s purpose; why he’s acting to such degrees of importance and what events cause this. There is clearly need to know.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, by J.K. Rowling:

  • Does it have action: Yes and no. No fighting or chase scenes if that’s what you meant. Yes, we follow characters other than the main one around. There is contrast between them and wizards looming around the muggle world. It’s not until chapter four that we actually enter the wizard world.
  • Is there curiosity? Yes, the first chapter refers to some event that happened before this new story begins. We also want to know what is going to happen to this poor baby that has been given to a mean bunch of people he’ll have to call family.

The Coldest Girl in Coldtown, by Holly Black:

  • Is there action? Yes? The MC wakes up in a bathtub after she’d drank too much the night before, only to find the rest of the partygoers are dead in the other room. She explores.
  • Is there curiosity? Yes, we immediately want to know how everyone died and how she survived. It sounds cliché, but only if you write it just like that. Holly Black used detail to mask many clichés.

The Merchant of Death, by D. J. MacHale:

  • Is there action? Sort of. Bobby is writing in past tense through a letter about leaving a pretty girl at his house to go someplace unknown with his uncle.
  • Is there curiosity? Yes, we know something has gone horribly wrong by the urgency and confusion Bobby speaks in. We also immediately want to know where his uncle takes him and why he’s acting this way.

Well, it looks like the beginning of my story can have action, but what’s most important (and I should mention the books I’ve chosen above are one’s I’d recommend to others) is that it entices the reader’s curiosity. Possibly create a purpose or a goal, or maybe rewrite the beginning in a way where the end of the story comes first so the reader wants more. Putting contrast between different characters or between how one usually acts and how they’re acting while in danger would both work. If you have many of these in many chapters, which one would create the most curiosity placed at the beginning? Go from there.

Thanks for reading,

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Twitter: https://twitter.com/WritingMime

Tumblr: http://writingmime.tumblr.com/

Other Blog: http://writingmime.blogspot.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime