Writing Readers Will Enjoy

 

When you first start writing a novel, you’re writing a story that follows a character or multiple characters; generally, you’re writing from your own head in expressing immediate ideas and observations that you see your characters experiencing. You try to be detailed as possible. Even though it’s told behind the eyes of characters in your book, it’s still considered your diary, because only you understand it’s depth.

Because this isn’t “The Diary of Anne Frank,” a nonfiction written by a girl for herself, you should consider your reader’s perspective on the story. To do this, you take your raw “diary” format of your story and revise it and take it to an editor. The goal is to avoid “Why did this happen?” Or “why did they do that?” Or even “this relationship is fake.”

You can add and change things for the readers so they can understand what you mean. Writers take many years to perfect their novels, gearing them toward their audience. However, when authors go under contract and are asked to kick out a book every year, this sometimes takes away from the process. The “diary” format within the year-old story is more raw than it should be, and it irritates the reader when not clarified.

Actions speak louder than words. Everything your character says in dialogue will be trumped by your character’s actions. The only thing that can trump actions is a character’s thoughts:

Be brutally honest. If you can’t think of what your characters are thinking at that moment, try to relate to them on an emotional level. If they’re feeling confused, write something like, “I have no clue why that happened,” after the character has happy dialogue with someone else. Maybe the character is feeling nervous, but their actions are jumpy and vibrant. Directly after you say, “They raced to the pole to see who could get there quicker,” write a thought like,” I should be at home taking care of Jesse.” Even if your actions, dialogue, and thoughts all have the same feeling, your readers will still appreciate your character, relating to them more then that they’re confident in what they’d suspected was true. Even if your readers can’t relate to the actions or dialogue your characters make, there will still be some sympathy toward their thoughts.

Tip: If you want an even more realistic story, think about how your other characters are feeling as your main character is off observing and feeling by themselves. If one character is away being stressed, how will they react to your character that is happy when they come together in the next chapter?

 

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Twitter: https://twitter.com/WritingMime

Tumblr: http://writingmime.tumblr.com/

Other Blog: http://writingmime.blogspot.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

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Organize Your Book Outline AND Decorate Your Wall!

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If you’d like to organize your chapters into wall décor for motivation, here are the steps to do so.

You will need:

  • Your first draft or outline of your book
  • Notecards
  • Colored paper
  • Marker, pen, or pencil
  • Scissors
  • Glue (optional)
  • String
  • Paperclips
  • Wall tacks or strong tape

Step 1: This will probably be the longest step. Start with your first draft or outline and think of each chapter as its own notecard. Fold each notecard in half so it looks like a two-page book. On the front, place a conflict. This usually comes as Character VS something, whether it be another character, the setting, or the plot. On the inside, on the left, place the chapter’s characters and below that, your setting. On the inner right side, place your plot. This is different from conflict. You are describing the movement or what is happening in the story during this chapter. On the back, leave a place for notes. Do this for each of your chapters.

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Step 2: Cut out rectangles that are slightly bigger than your notecards from the colored paper using scissors. To save time, cut in layers. Use different colors for a more rainbow look. These will be your dust jackets for your miniature books later.

Step 3 (optional): If you want to have some sort of mark-able area to show your progress through the chapters, cut out little squares to place on the front of your dust covers. You can either checkmark them when you’ve finished with that chapter, or you can color the square in to represent the times you’ve gone through it. When the meter reaches the top, your chapter is probably ready for an editor.

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Step 4: Place the notecards in the dust jackets in whatever color arrangement you want. Label the front of each miniature book with a chapter title or number. You may wait if you are not sure of the chapters’ order to do this.

Step 5 (optional): Maybe you want a little more motivation to finish your book. On the back of the dust cover, hide a prize that you will give yourself after finishing each chapter. Use a picture or write it down. Cut what it is out and use a paperclip to attach it to the dust cover, face-down.

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Step 6: Place a paperclip on the crease of the miniature book to connect the pages to the dust cover, and make sure some of the clip is sticking out to hang it from.

Step 7: Take a long string and pull it through the paperclips. Make sure you watch the order and what way the covers are facing. You don’t want to thread it last to first. If you don’t have enough string or wall space to put them all on one string, separate the chapters on multiple strings.

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Step 8: Align the strings of books on the wall and use strong tape or wall tacks to hold them in place. This will finish your project. WHAT A BEAUTIFUL WALL ART!

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KEEP WRITING!

WritingMime

Where you can find my books: http://www.amazon.com/Brista-Drake/e/B00YZGC792/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/writingmime

Twitter: https://twitter.com/WritingMime

Tumblr: http://writingmime.tumblr.com/

Other Blog: http://writingmime.blogspot.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/22704883-writingmime

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